MindConsiliums, 17(3), 1-16

Canul, G.D. (2017). Genealogical-PhotoTherapy as a tool for integrating my Mayan and Spanish origins. MindConsiliums, 17(3), 1-16.

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Abstract

The over simplification of being visibly ethnic (person of color) only continues to support the misunderstanding of the self and the other. By dividing the other and the self as either being light-skinned/ white or brown/ darker-skinned creates profound psychological divisions. The implications may be numerous. To receive active instruction from one’s parents increases the likelihood of a person making sense of one’s ethnic family history.

An approach to understanding oneself and the other may benefit from an integration of the explicit and implicit parts of one’s ethnic history and experiences. There may be familial circumstances and beliefs that impede a true known family history. Ascertaining the actual family of origin history and the influence on one’s ethnic identity may be blocked by parental figures and then consequently continued by oneself into adulthood.

The present paper identifies the elements that opened the door to an expanded self-understanding and deeper appreciation for the complexities of integrating a diverse historical background. The utilization of photographs, historical texts, and genealogical research provided the essential motivation to accept the invitation for the cathartic process.

Keywords: integratinghistorypsychohistorygenealogical-phototherapySephardic JewsYucatec Mayanrelational psychoanalysisphotoanalysis

About The Author

Gerardo D. Canul, PhD

Gerardo D. Canul, PhD, earned his doctoral degree in clinical psychology at Washington State University. He maintains an independent practice that includes providing training and consultations. Dr. Canul’s areas of interest are psychohistory, forensic psychology, and clinical child psychology. He is an associate professor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Irvine campus in California. He may be contacted at gcanul@thechicagoschool.edu.

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Contact information for the author:

Email: gcanul@thechicagoschool.edu

MindConsiliums, 16(7), 1-15

Kavaler-Adler, S. (2016). The historical reasons for the failure of Anne Sexton’s 1950s psychotherapy. MindConsiliums, 16(7), 1-15.

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THE HISTORICAL REASONS FOR THE FAILURE
OF ANNE SEXTON’S 1950s PSYCHOTHERAPY

by Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler (Ph.D., ABPP, D.Litt., NCPsyA)

Abstract

This study illustrates how the powerful influence of the 1950s New York Psychoanalytic Institute had severely limited the knowledge of American psychoanalysts, and particularly in relation to treatment of patients with preoedipal arrests and character disorders. The active rejection of all the clinical work with the character disorders done at Tavistock and at the British Psychoanalytic Society had profoundly impacted the work of Dr. Martin Orne, during the ten years when he attempted to treat Anne Sexton, a highly manic, narcissistic, and depressed borderline personality housewife, who became one of America’s most well known and highly honored poets.

Reflecting on elements of an in-depth study of Sexton in The Creative Mystique: From Red Shoes Frenzy to Love and Creativity (Kavaler-Adler, 2014), this study shows how Martin Orne’s lack of acquaintance with the writings of the British object relations theorists severely limited his ability to see the core psychic trauma impacting Sexton’s mind and body, and severely limited awareness of his counter-transference and of his views on “memory” in patients with character pathology. Yet, Dr. Orne was the only legitimate and compassionate psychoanalytic doctor that Sexton ever had.

The politics of the New York Psychoanalytic monopoly had wide ranging effects on clinical mental health treatment during the 1950s and 1960s, and presents a critical psycho-historical dilemma.

Keywords: Anne Sexton, psychohistory, borderline personality, psychotherapy, preoedipal trauma, psychoanalytic training

About The Author

Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD, ABPP, NPsyA, DLitt

Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler is a graduate of the Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies at Adelphi University, and has been practicing for over 35 years as a psychologist and psychoanalyst in New York City. She founded the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis in New York City in 1991, and has been this institute’s executive director ever since. She is also a supervisor and former faculty member at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies, and is a member of the Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society, where she had served as a faculty member at the Postgraduate Center for Mental Health.

Besides individual psychoanalytic psychotherapy and object relations psychoanalysis, Dr. Kavaler-Adler offers groups on mourning, creative blocks, and supervision. She conducts classes on “Projection and Projective Identification,” “The Analyst as an Instrument,” and others, using role playing; and courses on work of Ronald Fairbairn, Melanie Klein, D. W. Winnicott, Michael Balint, Wilfred Bion, and on her own theories of “developmental mourning” and “the demon- lover complex.” Dr. Kavaler-Adler also conducts workshops in self-sabotage, developmental mourning and psychic change, fear of success, envy, creative blocks, and compulsions.

Dr. Kavaler-Adler is the author of 5 books and 60 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters in the field of psychoanalysis and object relations theory. Three of her earlier books were published with Routledge: The Compulsion to Create: A Psychoanalytic Study of Women Writers (1993), The Creative Mystique: From Red Shoes Frenzy to Love and Creativity (1996), and Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change: A New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis (2003). The Other Press reprinted The Compulsion to Create as The Compulsion to Create: Women Writers and Their Demon Lovers (2000). Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s two recent books are published with Karnac: The Anatomy of Regret: From Death Instinct to Reparation and Symbolization through Vivid Clinical Cases (2013) and Klein-Winnicott Dialectic: Transformative New Metapsychology and Interactive Clinical Theory (2014).

Dr. Kavaler-Adler has won 12 awards for her books and articles, including the Gradiva Award from NAAP for Mourning, Spirituality and Psychic Change (published by Routledge) in 2004. She has won four Arlene Wohlberg Memorial Awards from Postgraduate Center for Mental Health for peer-reviewed journal articles, including “Mourning and Erotic Transference” in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis (1992, Vol. 3), and “My Graduation is My Mother’s Funeral” in The International Forum of Psychoanalysis. Dr. Kavaler-Adler received 7 Author’s Recognition Awards from the Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society and the National Institute for Psychotherapies.

www.kavaleradler.com – drkavaleradler@gmail.com – 212-674-5425
115 East 9th Street, 12P, NY, NY 10003

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MindConsiliums, 16(6), 1-14

Kavaler-Adler, S. (2016). Swallowed up by terror: The image of birds in Virginia Woolf and echoing images of terror in the internal world of patients: dissociated links to childhood. MindConsiliums, 16(6), 1-14.

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SWALLOWED UP BY TERROR: THE IMAGE OF BIRDS IN VIRGINIA WOOLF AND ECHOING IMAGES OF TERROR IN THE INTERNAL WORLD OF PATIENTS: DISSOCIATED LINKS TO CHILDHOOD

by Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler (Ph.D., ABPP, D.Litt., NCPsyA)

Abstract

This study integrates Virginia Woolf’s biography with her terror of losing her fragile self in compulsive merger with another, with her imagery of birds flocking together in a merger of terror and terrified impulse. Then two clinical case examples of profound childhood terror are depicted. The first case has the subjective experience of a child who trembles with terror in the face of a murderous borderline mother. One particular day of terror is seen from the child’s perspective, and dream material highlights the unconscious reflections of the terror of being destroyed by maternal poison, with its transference evolutions. The second case is also primal terror at an even earlier source, with a dream of prenatal imagery: the womb that destroys through lack of containment.

Keywords: psychoanalysis, creativity, developmental mourning, terror, preoedipal, symbolic, unthinkable anxieties, Virginia Woolf, creativity

About The Author

Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD, ABPP, NPsyA, DLitt

Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler is a graduate of the Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies at Adelphi University, and has been practicing for over 35 years as a psychologist and psychoanalyst in New York City. She founded the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis in New York City in 1991, and has been this institute’s executive director ever since. She is also a supervisor and former faculty member at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies, and is a member of the Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society, where she had served as a faculty member at the Postgraduate Center for Mental Health.

Besides individual psychoanalytic psychotherapy and object relations psychoanalysis, Dr. Kavaler-Adler offers groups on mourning, creative blocks, and supervision. She conducts classes on “Projection and Projective Identification,” “The Analyst as an Instrument,” and others, using role playing; and courses on work of Ronald Fairbairn, Melanie Klein, D. W. Winnicott, Michael Balint, Wilfred Bion, and on her own theories of “developmental mourning” and “the demon- lover complex.” Dr. Kavaler-Adler also conducts workshops in self-sabotage, developmental mourning and psychic change, fear of success, envy, creative blocks, and compulsions.

Dr. Kavaler-Adler is the author of 5 books and 60 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters in the field of psychoanalysis and object relations theory. Three of her earlier books were published with Routledge: The Compulsion to Create: A Psychoanalytic Study of Women Writers (1993), The Creative Mystique: From Red Shoes Frenzy to Love and Creativity (1996), and Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change: A New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis (2003). The Other Press reprinted The Compulsion to Create as The Compulsion to Create: Women Writers and Their Demon Lovers (2000). Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s two recent books are published with Karnac: The Anatomy of Regret: From Death Instinct to Reparation and Symbolization through Vivid Clinical Cases (2013) and Klein-Winnicott Dialectic: Transformative New Metapsychology and Interactive Clinical Theory (2014).

Dr. Kavaler-Adler has won 12 awards for her books and articles, including the Gradiva Award from NAAP for Mourning, Spirituality and Psychic Change (published by Routledge) in 2004. She has won four Arlene Wohlberg Memorial Awards from Postgraduate Center for Mental Health for peer-reviewed journal articles, including “Mourning and Erotic Transference” in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis (1992, Vol. 3), and “My Graduation is My Mother’s Funeral” in The International Forum of Psychoanalysis. Dr. Kavaler-Adler received 7 Author’s Recognition Awards from the Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society and the National Institute for Psychotherapies.

www.kavaleradler.com – drkavaleradler@gmail.com – 212-674-5425
115 East 9th Street, 12P, NY, NY 10003

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MindConsiliums, 15(12), 1-92

Schwartz, J. (2015). The secret of dreams and the case of Sigmund Freud (screenplay). MindConsiliums, 15(12), 1-92.

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Abstract

No doubt one of the most influential and controversial thinkers of the 20th century, Freud’s life and struggles speaks to our world today which is no stranger to the alternating violent and passionate forces that belie the human condition. So it is more than surprising that Freud’s biography has not found its way to the screen…until now.

This screenplay was engineered to stay as close to the written record and biographical accounts of Freud, his work and relationships, although any student of Freud will see that the author have taken liberties with the material to create the context and extrapolate possible back-story that belies the official record regarding the creation of Interpretation of Dreams and of Freud’s life. This is not an academic piece designed to educate the reader (or the audience,) although some education may occur, but to experience Freud as a man of his time, a scientist fighting to find a voice in a world full of ignorance, bias, racism, personal torment, and the courage to pursue his dreams to triumph against all odds.

Keywords: interpretation of dreamspsychoanalysispsychohistorySigmund Freudhistory of psychoanalysis

Introduction and History

Freud’s biography and the creation of psychoanalysis are so intertwined we can comfortably say they are one of the same. It is difficult to find another researcher who used more of his own self experience as the medium of scientific exploration than Freud. Much of what Freud put forth came from countless hours studying the nature of his patients’ complaints presented to him in private. That is how the label “talking cure” came into being, actually coined by Joseph Breuer from his famous Case of Anna O. The history of psychoanalysis is built upon people talking to each other, either one to one in session, small group meetings, and/or in a lecture hall or classroom. All this talk had literally changed the way people see the world, which has been both academically and clinically fascinating, but the truth is that people talking to each other in therapy doesn’t naturally lend itself to the visual-action medium of cinema, although there are a few notable exceptions to this.

Up to this current effort Freud’s life and with it the creation of psychoanalysis has mostly eluded filmmakers. In 1962 John Huston made a valiant effort in covering this material from a script by none other than Jean Paul Sartre. Sartre’s script, (which is an interesting story onto itself) however proved unwieldy and difficult to visualize and was later abandoned for a more concise and condensed treatment. The Huston film, with its shadowy, brooding style, and a tortured performance by Montgomery Clift as Freud, had its champions but received little public favor possibly condemning all future Freud projects in commercial film.

From the Huston film we have to travel forty years into the future to David Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method (2011), to offer up an energetic screen adaptation about the early days of psychoanalysis from John Kerr’s exhaustively researched account of the Sabina Spielrein – Carl Jung – Sigmund Freud triangle. With a dashing Viggo Morgenstern as Freud, and a brave performance by Kiera Knightly as the jaw jutting patient/student-analyst Spielrein , plus a tortured Michael Fassbender as Freud’s challenging protégé Carl Jung, enabled Cronenberg (who’s no stranger to mind body conundrums) to vigorously translate the Kerr material into a striking exploration of the sophomore days of the psychoanalytic movement.

This work, The Secret of Dreams and the Case of Sigmund Freud attempts to do what Huston ad Sartre first conceived, that is, to return to the beginning, where it all started, to visualize Freud’s dramatic discovery of the psychoanalytic method, building from the period before the creation of Interpretation of Dreams, which Freud himself considered his greatest contribution.

I came to this material 20 years ago, when doing research for a book on the clinical use of the manifest or remembered dream. In my research I came upon an article by Erik Erikson’s (1954), The Dream Specimen of Psychoanalysis article. Erikson’s article decidedly pointed to Freud’s “Dream of Irma’s Injection” as representing the true beginning of psychoanalysis. The dream and its analysis offered the first presentation of what was come to be known as the free associational method. The dream and its analysis fills all of chapter two in Freud’s dream book, and is considered by many as the book’s true opening chapter. Once I was alerted to the “Irma dream” and its significance I began to discover a whole trove of articles and research devoted to the specimen or Irma dream and its analysis, especially pointing to the many biographical elements that were clearly omitted in Freud’s original analysis. Studying the dream and the subsequent commentary led me to Freud’s incredible back story that comprised the latent content of the dream. In 1995, around the hundred year anniversary of the Irma Dream (July 24th 1895), I proposed a book as a memorial to this landmark occasion which brought together all the research and writings on the specimen dream under one comprehensive text, although the publisher was interested the project didn’t’ come together and the idea remained untapped.

Near twenty years later, prompted by friend and colleague Inna Rozentsvit, I returned to my original research and published an article “Freud’s Irma Dream, The Origin of Psychoanalysis and a Bloody Nose” (MindConsiliums, 2014), which received a Gradiva® nomination in 2015. This article then became the driver of a mixed media presentation, using narration, live actors, music, power point and props, to give life to this subject, especially emphasizing the precariousness of Freud’s direction at the time. That presentation was the impetus and platform what was to become a more comprehensive piece covering the spectrum of Freud’s life, both before and after them publication of The Interpretation of Dreams. In other words, I thought it had the makings of a fascinating film.

I found that the nature of the material suggested a more visceral, visual presentation hence the screenplay format. Like in Citizen Kane or other films based on a larger than life central figure taking place over a lifetime, a film treatment has the flexibility to readily shift between time frames, characters, location, and even between reality and dream.

The reader is asked to read the material and to watch the film unfold in their minds, since it has not been produced as of yet. It would prove great fun to imagine who would play Freud and his many cohorts. I have engineered this project to stay as close to the written record and biographical accounts of Freud, his work and relationships, although any student of Freud will see that I have taken liberties with the material to create the context and extrapolate possible back-story that belies the official record. This is not an academic piece designed to educate the reader (or the audience,) although some education may occur, but to experience Freud as a man of his time, a scientist fighting to find a voice in a world full of ignorance, bias, racism, personal torment and the courage to pursue his dreams to triumph against all odds.

About The Author

Jack Schwartz, LCSW, PsyD, NCPsyA

Jack Schwartz, LCSW, PsyD, NCPsyA is a psychoanalyst/psychotherapist in private practice, NJ. He graduated from the New Jersey Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis, where he is a faculty member, lecturer and control analyst. He is a NAAP Nationally Certified Psychoanalyst, Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor. He holds degrees from Fairleigh Dickinson University Yeshiva University (where he received the Distinguished Graduate Student Award) and International University. He served as the Senior Forensic Psychologist in Passaic County New Jersey for over 15 years, specializing in criminal investigations, probation, child custody issues, and has regularly served the court as an expert witness. Dr. Schwartz maintains a full private practice in Northern New Jersey, working with children, adolescents, couples and adults. He frequently lectures on dream analysis, PTSD, resilience and other matters related to the practice of psychoanalytic psychotherapy. He is a regular contributor to the New Jersey Institute Viewpoints newsletter, and is the editor for the NJ Clinical Social Worker highly regarded newsletter, the Forum. Dr. Schwartz has written both short fiction, and technical articles on Dream Analysis and Holocaust Survivors, and has published a psychoanalytic novel, Our Time is Up, available on Amazon, soon to be an e-book. Dr. Schwartz’s article “Freud’s Irma Dream, The Origin of Psychoanalysis and a Bloody Nose” was published in multi-disciplinary journal MindConsiliums in 2014 (MindConsiliums). It had received a Gradiva® nomination from the National Association for Advancement of Psycho-analysis in 2015.

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Contact Dr. Jack Schwartz at psyjack@msn.com

MindConsiliums, 15(10), 1-10

Kolsky, B. (2015). Empathy and secrecy: Discovering suicide as a form of addiction. MindConsiliums, 15(10), 1-10.

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Abstract

This paper is about the complexities of working with suicidal patients by focusing on the concept of suicide addiction. Based on the author’s successful extended psychoanalytic work with a suicidal patient and informed by her long experience with the methods of Heinz Kohut’s empathic attunement, she proposes that some patients conceal their suicidal thoughts and use them, as others use alcohol or drugs. This suicide addiction, as it came to be seen through therapy, contained all of the characteristics of addiction with a particular emphasis on secrecy.

It is also proposed that a significant number of suicidal patients are addicted to thoughts of suicide. The aim of this article is to share this understanding with other clinicians and to the public, to alert them to particular signs that characterize the patient whose own death has become a secret obsession.

Keywords: suicideaddictiontraumasecrecyempathic attunementsuicide preventionPTSD.

[The author declares that there is no conflict of interest regarding the publication of this paper.]

About The Author

Beverly Kolsky, LCSW, BCD-P

Beverly Kolsky, LCSW, BCD-P is a psychoanalyst who has been practicing for more than 30 years. She has lived and worked both in England and in the United States. Her theoretical background is an eclectic mix including British object relations, combined with the work of Carl Jung, and most importantly for this subject, the practice of Heinz Kohut’s Self Psychology.

Ms. Kolsky holds an undergraduate degree in English from Boston University, an MSW from New York University, and a certificate in psychoanalysis from The New York Institute for Psychoanalytic Self Psychology. She also received training at the TavistockClinic inLondonwhere she worked on a teaching project under the auspices of its Institute for Marital Studies. While in London, she was affiliated with the Society for Analytic Psychology and the Guild of Psychotherapists. She is in private practice in Englewood, New Jersey.

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Contact information for the author:

Beverly Kolsky

163 Engle Street, Bldg. 5, Englewood, New Jersey, 07631

Email: beverlykolsky@gmail.com

MindConsiliums, 15(8), 1-9

Ciacci, A. (2015). The tombs of the ego: Transgenerational trauma and failures of introjection. MindConsiliums, 15(8), 1-9.

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A previous version of this work was published in Le Coq-Héron, 2015/2 (n. 221), Toulouse, France: Éditions Érès, 95 – 103. Permission to publish in English was obtained by the author. No conflict of interest was declaired.

This paper was presented at the International Ferenczi Conference, Heritage of the Mind, in Toronto, Canada, May 2015.

Abstract

The author approaches the theme of transgenerational transmission of psychic trauma and sequella of parental suffering for subsequent generations, individuating in the concept of introjection as the keystone of comprehension of the development and the transmission of psychic life. Through a few clinical examples, he shows how this process and its failures can present themselves, and how these can be individuated in the analytical treatment.

Keywords: introjection, incorporation, unconscious identification, transgenerational transmission, traumatic reproduction, dis-identification.

About The Author

Andrea Ciacci

Andrea Ciacci, a psychologist and psychotherapist, privately practices psychotherapy between Florence and Siena. He completed his training at the ‘H.S. Sullivan’ Institute of Psychoanalysis, Florence, Italy, where he teaches Clinical Epistemology and Psychoanalysis of Institutions.

Andrea Ciacci is on the board of directors of the Italian Society of Interpersonal Psychoanalysis (SIPI). He also functions as honorary judge at the Juvenile Court of Florence.

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Contact the author by mail at Via Noce, 7 – 50028 Tavarnelle Val di Pesa (FI) – Italy, or by email at andrea.ciacci@libero.it or by telephone at +39.377 4129444

MindConsiliums, 15(7), 1-18

Nobre, A. (2015). Psychoanalysis and the power of deconstruction-reconstruction of symbolic, semiotic, and existential life experiences—the talking cure in severe trauma. MindConsiliums, 15(7), 1-18.

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Presented at the XVIII International Forum of Psychoanalysis of the International Federation of Psychoanalytic Societies (IFPS) in Kaunas, Lithuania; September 17-19, 2014.

First published (in Portuguese) in Revista Portuguesa de Psicanálise e Psicoterapia Psicanalítica (Portuguese Journal of Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy) of the corresponding national association. Permission to publish this in English was obtained by the author. No conflicts of interests apply.

Abstract

The linear approach to reality that supports the division of human existence into “have(s) and have-not(s),” as any dichotomy, enables simplification and the perceived expectation of control which, in turn, leads to the organization of solutions to these black-and-white problems.

This reductive approach has some advantages, but it blocks the way to an alternative, which accepts the risks of an open system approach. This alternative approach may focus on complexity and not on problem solving quick-fixes. The key issue is that while partial and local solutions may be searched for and used, simultaneously, their intrinsic limitations are constantly being questioned. This implies that their frailties may be dealt with through continuous openness to better answers and to greater degrees of understanding.

Meaning-making, symbolic reasoning and open interpretation are examples of approaches that characterize a human being’s capacity to question and to inquire. That may be seriously limited through the experience of severe traumatic events. Trauma leads to closure and to the interruption of the natural developmental processes of mental growth. Psychoanalysis offers powerful theoretical and therapeutic insights that have opened the ground for intervention in these cases. This intervention is complex in itself, and the workings of the talking cure may be better understood through their impact at symbolic, semiotic and existential levels of life as it is experienced, both by the patient and by the psychoanalyst.

The present paper addresses these processes and argues that relational psychoanalysis, which is centred on the dynamic experiences on the analytic pair, are crucial both to understand the power of psychoanalysis and to understand the process of this cathartic healing talking cure itself.

Keywords: mental growthdevelopmenttraumapsychoanalytic curesymbolic reasoningsemioticsexistentialismrelational psychoanalysis.

About The Author

Ângela Lacerda Nobre

Ângela Lacerda Nobre, born in Lisbon, Portugal, in 1960, has a diversified academic background which includes nursing, economics, philosophy, semiotics, and psychoanalysis.

Ângela Lacerda Nobre teaches at the Escola Superior de Ciências Empresariais do Instituto Politécnico de Setúbal, a business school in Portugal, since 1998. Her PhD (2010) is in Organisational Learning, and the title of her dissertation was: “Semiotic Learning: A Conceptual Framework for Facilitating Learning in Knowledge-intensive Organisations.”

Ângela Lacerda Nobre has published multiple academic articles and book chapters; and has posted educational videos and personal narratives and interviews on Youtube, at Agere Research 2012 ALNobre.

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Contact the author at lacerda.nobre@gmail.com or angela.nobre@esce.ips.pt

MindConsiliums, 15(6), 1-9

Saraiva, M.J. (2015). Where there was no place for me to exist, I was left without me: Severe disorders brought by non-relationship, by non-love. MindConsiliums, 15(6), 1-9.

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Member of the Portuguese Association of Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

This paper was presented at the XVIII International Forum of Psychoanalytic Societies in Kaunas, Lithuania: Psychoanalysis, Trauma and Severe Mental Disorders; September 16-19, 2014.

Translated and edited from Portuguese.

Abstract

This paper offers a look at the relational inability of the object (the mother), which in turn generates incapacity in the subject (the child). The absence of a primary quality relationship, or even the existence of something that cannot be described as a relationship, introduces trauma and transforms the subject’s potential, emptying it, and possibly leading to severe and profound non-being

I propose that there is a deeper relational mismatch of consequent trauma and pathology, when the child is “gifted” and the parents are “sub-gifted,” indicating a possible link between giftedness and severe mental disorders. The emptiness leads to emptiness, and the non-concavity of the object leads to the subject’s emotional abortion and to the prediction of his non-existence; and finally, to the challenges the psychoanalyst must face when working with the gifted subject. One must decipher both an understanding of reality beyond the objective reality of the subject, and his ability to engage in a deep analytic relationship. This is indispensable and necessary for the rebirth and existence of the subject

Keywords: trauma, relational inability, emotional incapacity, mother-child relationship, emotional concavity, giftedness

About The Author

Maria João Saraiva

Maria João Saraiva graduated with degree in psychology in 1986, from the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Coimbra. She is a member of the Portuguese Association of Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy.

Publications by Maria João Saraiva:

  • 2014: Article in Psicologia na Actualidade: In the middle of the bridge between the incapacity and the envy of the object – the hashes or … Psychoanalysis is blue.
  • 2013: Book: I’ve emigrated – it rains music on my hands/ Is it that birds also leave sad?
  • 2013: Preface of the book by Richard Raubolt: Cenários psicanalíticos do trauma.
  • 2013: Article in Psicologia na Actualidade: Psychoanalysis–the improbable relation in the now.
  • 2012: Article in Psicologia na Actualidade: Winter.
  • 2012: Article in the magazine of the Portuguese Association of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: Repetition – the Time machine.
  • 2011: Book: Until me: The living of psychoanalysis, published by Coisas de Ler Publishing House.
  • 2010: Book: The Pain you Left me, published by Trilhos and Coisas de Ler Publishing Houses.
  • 2010: Article in the magazine of the Portuguese Association of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: The Guilt – Notes.
  • 2010: Article in País Positivo and in Jornal Público: Psychoanalyst, the diver of pearls, the maker of places.

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Maria João Saraiva can be reached by email at mjoaosaraiva@gmail.com.

MindConsiliums, 14(9), 1-49

Schwartz, J. (2014). Freud’s Irma Dream, the Origin of Psychoanalysis, and a Bloody Nose. MindCosiliums, 14(9), 1-49.

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Abstract

Freud (1900) conceived the entirety of The Interpretation of Dreams “on the model of an imaginary walk” (p.122). Chapter Two begins with the analysis of the “dream specimen” (Erikson, 1954), otherwise known as the “dream of Irma’s injection” or the “Irma dream.” While the Irma dream has sparked a cottage industry in psychotherapeutic approaches to dream analysis, Freud’s original intention of using dreams as a heuristic device has instead become ironically an object of study about Freud himself. If one is to return to Freud’s original premise and method of dream interpretation, after adapting some valuable insights of later psychotherapists, then a different and historically accurate interpretation of the Irma dream emerges, and the intended focus upon the therapeutic value of the process of discussing dreams is restored. I invite the reader to use the same “imaginary walk” as an approach to this paper and to my review of the major life circumstances from which the dream arises. I then move to a review of a number of important papers which re-interpret the Irma dream. Each writer’s approach to the Irma dream offers new insights into Freud’s deeper motivations and professional struggles, and helps us see the many changes in how clinicians listen and work with dreams. Following this, I move on to my contribution of reviewing the Irma dream as a window into Freud’s consulting room, interpreting the key transferences (most importantly identifying Irma’s transference to Freud), in addition to the countertransferences and resistances embedded in the structure if the specimen dream.

Approaching the 120-year mark, the dream of Irma’s injection has also become the medium through which clinicians have supported, expanded, and even attacked Freud’s theories, methods, and personal integrity (Masson, 1984). It has captured the imagination and interest of generations of analysts and psychohistorians, and provided a psychobiographical window into the Father of Psychoanalysis at the moment of his greatest and most enduring discovery. In truth, the controversy surrounding this dream stems not only from its controversial nature or historical interest, but also from Freud’s incomplete handling of it. Hence, when I am referring to the Irma dream here, unless otherwise specified I am referring to both the dream text and its accompanying associations.

About The Author

Jack Schwartz, PsyD, LCSW, NCPsyA

Jack Schwartz is a nationally certified psychoanalyst and a faculty member, lecturer, and control analyst at the New Jersey Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis. While maintaining a full private practice in northern New Jersey, Dr. Schwartz is a regular contributor and writer for a variety of clinical journals and is the author of a psychoanalytic novel called Our Time is Up.

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Keywords

Freud, Dream Interpretation, Irma’s injection, psychohistory, psychobiography

MindConsiliums, 14(1), 19-43

Kavaler-Adler, S. (2014). Erotic transference: A journey to passion and symbolization. MindConsiliums, 14(1), 19-43.

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Abstract

This article offers an understanding of the developmental evolution of psychoanalytic work with the erotic transference. Having for so long been seen as a resistance, rather than as the manifestation of the primal unconscious longings, the erotic transference needs to be understood both in object relations terms as a transitional object relationship, and in object relations terms as a psychic fantasy evolution. This evolution is generated by a multi-dimensional mourning process, which is both intrapsychically and developmentally motivated. This paper offers the theory and related clinical examples that integrate our conceptualization of erotic transference as a journey from protosymbolic enactment to symbolic passion and poetic self-expression. This paper also distinguishes the patient with protosymbolic visceral and behavioral enactments from the neurotic patient with oedipal love symbolization and oedipal level conflicts. Both heterosexual and homosexual aspects of erotic transference are addressed, with the homoerotic in the heterosexual person being given attention as well. Countertransference perceptions and sensation are also seen in the light of the patient’s developmental evolution.

About The Author

Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD, ABPP, NPsyA, DLitt

Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler is a graduate of the Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies at Adelphi University, and has been practicing for over 35 years as a psychologist and psychoanalyst in New York City. She founded the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis in New York City in 1991, and has been this institute’s executive director ever since. She is also a supervisor and former faculty member at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies, and is a member of the Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society, where she had served as a faculty member at the Postgraduate Center for Mental Health.

Besides individual psychoanalytic psychotherapy and object relations psychoanalysis, Dr. Kavaler-Adler offers groups on mourning, creative blocks, and supervision. She conducts classes on “Projection and Projective Identification,” “The Analyst as an Instrument,” and others, using role playing; and courses on work of Ronald Fairbairn, Melanie Klein, D. W. Winnicott, Michael Balint, Wilfred Bion, and on her own theories of “developmental mourning” and “the demon- lover complex.” Dr. Kavaler-Adler also conducts workshops in self-sabotage, developmental mourning and psychic change, fear of success, envy, creative blocks, and compulsions.

Dr. Kavaler-Adler is the author of 5 books and 60 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters in the field of psychoanalysis and object relations theory. Three of her earlier books were published with Routledge: The Compulsion to Create: A Psychoanalytic Study of Women Writers (1993), The Creative Mystique: From Red Shoes Frenzy to Love and Creativity (1996), and Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change: A New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis (2003). The Other Press reprinted The Compulsion to Create as The Compulsion to Create: Women Writers and Their Demon Lovers (2000). Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s two recent books are published with Karnac: The Anatomy of Regret: From Death Instinct to Reparation and Symbolization through Vivid Clinical Cases (2013) and Klein-Winnicott Dialectic: Transformative New Metapsychology and Interactive Clinical Theory (2014).

Dr. Kavaler-Adler has won 12 awards for her books and articles, including the Gradiva Award from NAAP for Mourning, Spirituality and Psychic Change (published by Routledge) in 2004. She has won four Arlene Wohlberg Memorial Awards from Postgraduate Center for Mental Health for peer-reviewed journal articles, including “Mourning and Erotic Transference” in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis (1992, Vol. 3), and “My Graduation is My Mother’s Funeral” in The International Forum of Psychoanalysis. Dr. Kavaler-Adler received 7 Author’s Recognition Awards from the Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society and the National Institute for Psychotherapies.

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Keywords

transitional object, transference, countertransference, mourning, developmental mourning, erotic transference, homosexual, lesbian, heterosexual, protosymbolic, enactment, intrapsychic.